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Art and Design

Intent (Aims)

We believe that high-quality art and design education should engage, inspire and challenge pupils, equipping them with the knowledge and skills to experiment, invent and create their own works of art, craft and design. As pupils progress, they should be able to think critically and develop a more rigorous understanding of art and design. They should also know how art and design both reflect and shape our history, and contribute to the culture, creativity and wealth of our nation.

Implementation (Teaching and Learning)

Art comes in many forms: drama, dance, poetry, craft, painting, sketching, digital art, music, mixed-media and sculpture to name but a few. It has the ability to be weaved throughout the curriculum and we do not under-estimate its importance. Research suggests that the arts develop creativity, a core pre-requisite of innovative mind sets, communicative attitudes and problem solving; it seems obvious that the skill of ‘creating’ is fundamental to the development of solutions. Furthermore, the teaching and learning of art has been proven to have a positive impact on handwriting, social skills and overall well-being.

The National Curriculum for Art aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • produce creative work, exploring their ideas and recording their experiences
  • become proficient in drawing, painting, sculpture and other art, craft and design techniques
  • evaluate and analyse creative works using the language of art, craft and design
  • know about great artists, craft makers and designers, and understand the historical and cultural development of their art forms.

In every year group, children will learn about a variety of artists and the artist will underpin the style of art the children will study.

After learning about a particular artist, children will invest time in developing their arts skills in that area, with a clear progression of skills seen in their sketchbooks. At the end of the unit, children will plan and create a final piece of art in the style of or inspired by the artist and reflect on the skills they have developed throughout the unit. Regular opportunities to share their creations with other members of the school are present.

Impact (Assessment and Recording)

Art learning is recorded in sketchbooks across the school and should typically evidence all four stages (Generating Ideas, Making, Knowledge and Evaluation). We encourage children to treat their sketchbooks like journals and their thoughts and learning are recorded in a format that they would like to use, for example, using thought bubbles. Each child is unique and each sketchbook should be unique, enabling children to develop their independence and creativity.

Teachers assess children’s knowledge, understanding and skills in Art by making observations of the children working during lessons. Feedback given to children by their peers or teachers is in the form of post-it notes on the learning so that their art is not marked in the process. Children are also encouraged to be critical of their own work, highlighting their own next steps. After each project, or a minimum of twice a year, teachers complete assessment grids, showing children’s attainment in the following four areas: Generating ideas, Making, Knowledge, and Evaluation.

Spiritual, moral, social and cultural development and British Values

Collaborative work in Art develops mutual respect for the differing opinions, beliefs and abilities of others. In addition, children develop a respect for the environment, for their own health and safety and that of others. They learn to appreciate the value of similarities and differences and learn to show tolerance. A variety of experiences teaches them to appreciate that all people – and their views – are equally important.